Engaging High Risk Patients through Care Management (Part 2)


Post by Vicki Harter, BA, RRT


Vice President, Care Transformation

In part one of this post on engaging high-risk patients through care management, I discussed how different patient segments require different levels of care management relationships and tools. For the highest risk patients, a patient engagement strategy is centered on high intensity care management. Next, let’s look at how technology can help care management have a greater impact on outcomes for the highest risk segment.

Coordinating Care Across a Multi-Disciplinary Team

The care for a high risk patient can involve a large team including multiple specialists, pharmacists, care managers, office assistants, community health organizations and family members or friends. Coordinating activities among a diverse team requires shared access to a longitudinal patient record that gives a comprehensive “360 degree view” of the patient. The 360 degree view includes information such as:

  • Claims data (e.g. services obtained, medications, etc)
  • Dynamic care plans
  • Lab results
  • Medications
  • Patient outreach information
  • Patient supplied information (biometrics, logs/journals, preferences, etc.)
  • Predictive analytics such as a readmissions risk score, clinical risk, forecasted cost, etc.
  • Barriers to care
  • Gaps in care/quality measures that need to be closed
  • Important non-clinical information (e.g. patient motivation, family support team members, life events such as a recently deceased spouse, and other social factors)

With this enriched view of the patient, care team members across the continuum can work more efficiently together closing gaps in knowledge and communication while operating at the top of their license. This can result in reduced redundancy in assessments, surveys and tests. Today, enterprise population health technology can bring together and make available all of this information in a shared workspace even if the information is stored in disparate IT systems.

Incorporating a patient-centered approach

A deeper understanding of patients helps drive a patient-centered approach, which is critical for patient engagement. For example, if a patient is motivated to achieve a certain goal such as travel to her daughter’s wedding, then every member of the care team can reinforce her motivation and encourage the patient and engage them in the plan of care. If every care team member has access to all patient information, then patients won’t have to repeat the same information to different care team members and patients begin to sense coordination among providers. If there is a family member, friend or community organization that plays a key role in the patient receiving care, then that critical piece of info will be incorporated into the assigning of tasks. The end result is a personalized plan of care. If patients see that the entire team “knows” them, it improves the overall patient experience, builds trust and can improve engagement.

Optimizing time with patients

Care managers are often challenged by a high volume of daily manual tasks. For example, in order to assess a patient and complete a care plan, care managers must track down and synthesize information from multiple systems and offline sources. With a full case load, efficiency is a challenge that ultimately impacts the amount of time care managers can spend focused on patients. Technology can help care managers spend more time with patients by automating time-consuming tasks. For example:

  • Care plans, task lists and interventions can be automatically generated and updated from assessment responses
  • Complete medication histories can display order history and fill history to enable faster review and support compliance review
  • Patient workloads or specific tasks can be reassigned to other care managers or support staff, assuring “top of license” activity
  • High risk patients can be tracked across the continuum through event-based alerts (e.g. admissions, discharges or blue tooth device alerts).

To summarize the main takeaway from both posts, patient engagement and care management strategies are closely linked and should be tailored by segment. As part of population health initiatives where the focus is often on high-risk patients, patient engagement strategies should be on a one-to-one basis, and linked to relationship building through high-intensity care management. New population health technology has emerged to help coordinate care for the highest risk patients. As more providers make the shift to value-based care and seek efficiencies to help them scale programs, I believe that technology will play a central role in helping the highest risk patients. If you’d like to discuss your care management strategies in more detail then send us a note here.